Summer Music Clinic 2015    

Contact: Elizabeth Snodgrass
Phone: 608-263-2242 elizabeth.snodgrass@wisc.edu
21 N. Park St., Rm 7359
455 N. Park St Madison WI 53715

 
        show choir rehearsal  
           

Senior Session—2017 Class Descriptions

Senior Session—2018 Class Descriptions will be available here later this year.


Performing Ensembles

Band; Choir; Jazz Ensemble; Musical Theater; Orchestra

Applied Group lessons

Brass/Woodwind/Percussion Class; String Class; Voice Class; Jazz Notes for Piano/Bass/Guitar/Drums; Classical Guitar; Classical Piano

Courses

Acting—Learn the skills needed to project your voice clearly, represent your character through body movement, and take your performance to the next level.

Animation—Music provides a great connective thread across multiple genres and styles of animation. This course examines industry history, techniques, and trends, plus important figures in animation from around the globe.

Composition/Arranging—Acquire skills that help you creatively combine melody, harmony, and rhythm in your own music. Theory background helpful.

Concert Band Literature—Listen to great compositions of the concert band and wind ensemble literature. Study Sousa to Holst, as well as the most current innovators.

Conducting: Choral—Learn fluid beat patterns and expressive skills, view scores ranging from classic literature to contemporary compositions, and experience preparation and performance from the podium.

Conducting: Instrumental—Learn fluid beat patterns and expressive skills, view scores ranging from classic literature to contemporary compositions, and experience preparation and performance from the podium.

Evolution of Music Notation—Chart the development of music notation from the Middle Ages to current day and discover how notation responded to the needs of the time.

Funk/Fusion—Study influential funk artists from 1968 to 1980, including Weather Report, Tower of Power, and Chick Corea.

Global Pop—Explore current pop music styles from around the globe, and their connections to both local and international cultures. The course will cover J-pop, K-pop, Eurovision, Afrobeat, and Persian house music.

Hamilton—Get an in-depth look at the groundbreaking Broadway show blending historical facts with current social issues using hip-hop and other musical styles.

Hit Songwriting—Whether or not you’ve ever written a song, come learn the basics of crafting lyrics and melodies in a popular-style song.

Jazz Improvisation: Instrumental, Beginning—Get an introduction to jazz scales, rhythmic styles, and standard patterns that will help you take effective solos with ensembles.

Jazz Improvisation: Instrumental, Continuing—Learn to craft more challenging improvisational passages in jazz works.

Mobility and Music—Explore the role music plays in migration, tourism, identity, and the global economy. Each day’s discussion will be generated from case studies and trends.

Musical Theater Tips and Tech—Learn about auditions, projection, and dramatic movement, as well as production aspects of theater such as direction and staging.

Music Resources—Learn about the latest online resources in the world of music, and visit the UW-Madison music library to view their extensive collections.

Percussion Ensemble—Join other experienced percussionists to study works written for ensembles.

Performance Critique: Piano—Bring prepared solo literature and accompaniment to receive faculty comments on your performance in a master-class format.

Performance Critique: Strings—Bring prepared solo literature and accompaniment to receive faculty comments on your performance in a master-class format.

Performance Critique: Voice—Bring prepared solo literature and accompaniment to receive faculty comments on your performance in a master-class format.

Physics of Music—Explore a variety of scientific topics through a musical lens, from the impact of materials used in building instruments to the acoustic design of concert halls.

Poetry as Inspiration—Consider how descriptive language informs performance. This course considers how poetry has been set to music and how music has been inspired by the spoken word, and discusses the impact of Bob Dylan’s recent Nobel Prize win. There will also be opportunities to write and read your own poems inspired by specific forms of music.

Rhythm and Blues—Learn about the main elements of this musical genre, milestones in its history, and prominent performers. The course also covers R&B’s impact on the broadcast and recording industries.

Singing by Rote—Many musical communities thrive without notation. Explore what we can learn about making music together without relying on the written page.

Sightsinging Strategies—Practice sightsinging approaches designed to help vocalists gain facility with standard rhythmic patterns and interval recognition.

Symphonic String Literature—Study inspiring orchestral literature ranging from performance favorites to challenging excerpts in the repertoire.

Swing Dance—Learn classic dance steps set to music from 1940s and ’50s.

Theory: Basics—Review major, minor, diminished, and dominant-seventh chords, as well as various clefs, notation and scale degrees, and musical rhythms and patterns.

Theory: Intro to AP—Get resources for studying the advanced theory skills tested on the Advanced Placement (AP) exam.

Vocal Mechanics and Health—Learn about physiological aspects that contribute to sound, how to maintain flexibility and longevity, vocal production differences between male and female voices, and the acoustics of singing.

Women Composers—Throughout history, women composers have often been overshadowed by their male counterparts. Beginning with Hildegard, find examples of compositional creativity within social constraints.

Yoga for that Performers—Practice a variety of relaxation exercises and meditations for mind and body that can aid with music practice and performance.

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