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Independent Learning: Social Sciences

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Academic Administrative Team at DCS: Sarah Korpi, David Werther: il@dcs.wisc.edu

Student Services: 1-877-895-3276

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Online Writing Lab: owl.wisconsin.edu

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Social Science Courses

Our distance learning programs in Social Sciences offer you the flexibility and convenience of taking a class at “your pace, your place” from experienced, highly qualified, and caring instructors.

Social Science courses are a requirement of many degree programs and are a popular elective. The flexible pace of our distance education courses allows you to fully absorb the material and enjoy the experience. History courses may earn up to 3 university-level credits (seek pre-approval from your department or institute). Classes are available by correspondence or online.


Independent Reading in WI Native American History (Credits Vary)

An introduction to the general field of Native American history with a special focus on Wisconsin and the Great Lakes region. This course is offered with multiple credit options (1, 2, or 3), with the higher credit options including additional assignments and readings.

Cultural Anthropology and Human Diversity (Online, 3 Credits)

A cross-cultural perspective of human cultures and the methods used by anthropologists to understand them. After studying the origins of human culture and learning the fundamental concepts and definitions used by anthropologists, you will conduct in-depth explorations of the Yanomamö and the !Kung San. You will also explore the historical development and diversity of modern-day societies, discovering ways persistently marginalized groups in the United States negotiate the conditions of exclusion and marginalization.

Environmental Conservation (Online, 3 Credits)

This introductory course in environmental science explores issues arising during the interactions between the natural world (biosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere) and cultural world (demographics, economics, politics, and technology). Students examine such topics as air and water pollution, global climate change, energy alternatives and energy efficiency, solid and hazardous waste, loss of biodiversity, human health, food resources, effects of urbanization, and the management of public lands. Strong emphasis is placed on evaluating potential solutions to identified environmental problems.

Introduction to American Politics and Government (Online, 4 Credits)

An introduction to political science, with a focus on the federal governmental system. You will explore the relationship of the federal government to state and local governments, the constitutional basis, the structure of the three branches, political processes, policy making, civil rights and liberties, and some of the problems currently facing the nation.

Abnormal Psychology (Online, 3 Credits)

Review of the historical backgrounds of psychology, as well as its current perspectives, theories, and research methods. Consider various mental and personality disorders (including depression, schizophrenia, eating disorders, and psychopathic behaviors) and explore the etiology, treatment, and outcome for each. The course concludes with a look at the legal and ethical issues surrounding psychological treatment for individuals, including voluntary and involuntary commitment.

Introduction to Psychology (Online, 3 Credits)

This course studies behavior. You will consider the biological basis of behavior, as well as development, motivation, learning, emotion, personality, language, and social behavior.

Introduction to Social Psychology (Online, 3 Credits)

This course examines basic psychological factors in social behavior, including social perception, attitudes, prejudice, discrimination, attraction, social influence, modeling, prosocial behavior, aggression, sexual behavior, social exchange, and group behavior.

Racial and Ethnic Minorities (Online, 3 Credits)

A consideration of the interaction of social and cultural groups in America. You will explore the processes leading to group contact, as well as the characteristics and contributions of ethnic groups; sources of prejudice mechanisms and problems of group adjustment; contemporary status of principal minority groups; and proposals for the reduction of intergroup tensions.

Racial and Ethnic Minorities (Online, 3 Credits)

A consideration of the interaction of social and cultural groups in America. You will explore the processes leading to group contact, as well as the characteristics and contributions of ethnic groups; sources of prejudice mechanisms and problems of group adjustment; contemporary status of principal minority groups; and proposals for the reduction of intergroup tensions.

Introduction to Social Psychology (Online, 3 Credits)

This course examines basic psychological factors in social behavior, including social perception, attitudes, prejudice, discrimination, attraction, social influence, modeling, prosocial behavior, aggression, sexual behavior, social exchange, and group behavior.

Introduction to Philosophy (Online, 4 Credits)

Welcome to Introduction to Philosophy, a four-credit university-level course. This course includes an introduction to: the subject of philosophy and its subfields; free will and determinism; theories of morality and justice; the existence of God and the problem of evil; mind and matter, skepticism and certainty. Our aim is to think rationally and critically about rival views on these topics. We do so by assessing arguments offered by Anselm, Aquinas, Descartes, Hume, Kant, Mill, Rawls et al. and-as a result-hone our skills in critical thinking and argumentation.


Social Science Team:

Jac Bulk

Jeanne Connors

Jackie Splitter

Andrew Stravers