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Leading for Racial Equity Part 1: Becoming an Anti-Racist Organization

Upcoming dates (1)

For registration assistance: 608-262-2451
Register by mail: printable registration form

Summary

This class is offered in a highly participatory live-online format.

Transform your commitment to racial equity into anti-racist leadership in this new two-part class. In part 1, learn the key features of an anti-racist organization, assess the readiness of your organization to move toward anti-racism and plan next steps. Open to anyone with an intermediate understanding of racial equity who is ready to impact their organization's programs, practices, policies and decisions.

*Part 1 maybe taken independently of part 2, but it is a prerequisite for part 2

Overview

Black Lives Matter. In Wisconsin, Black residents fare worst in the nation on key metrics related to education, health and well-being. Organizations are choosing to take responsibility and action to address those disparities. How do we do better?

In this two-part class*, participants will be challenged to transform their commitment to racial equity into anti-racist leadership. Not limited to supervisors and managers, this course is for anyone with an intermediate understanding** of racial equity who is ready to impact their organization's programs, practices, policies and decisions to better align to values of social justice and racial equity.

In part 1, participants will learn the key features of an anti-racist organization, assess the readiness of their organization to move toward anti-racism and plan next steps.

Learning outcomes

  • Discuss the key features of an anti-racist organization
  • Assess the strengths and areas of growth for your organization and its readiness to in becoming anti-racist
  • Plan next steps to move your organization toward anti-racism

*Part 1 may be taken independently, or it may be taken as a prerequisite for part 2

**Intermediate understanding of racial equity means that you could explain the following concepts to someone else: Black Lives Matter, implicit bias, microaggressions and institutional/systemic racism. If you aren't able to do that yet, then please participate in a program to build your understanding of racial equity before attending this series.

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Overview: Extra Information

Your facilitators:

ananda mirilli (MS, UW–Madison) is the executive director of nINA Collective, an enterprise dedicated to supporting organizations, institutions and individuals as they advance their change process and racial equity initiatives. A native of Brazil, ananda has a long history of working with communities in the U.S. and abroad, and is the grant director to address racial disproportionality in special education for the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction.

At age 14 she engaged in social justice movements advocating for children with multiple abilities, seniors experiencing poverty, and youth experiencing homelessness. After moving to the U.S. ananda became an educator and found her passion facilitating learning spaces for individuals, groups and organizations engaging in transformative work. ananda's commitment to racial and gender justice led her to develop new frames for youth and women's leadership. As a skilled facilitator, ananda has engaged with thousands of youth, women and diverse professionals, building coalition and solidarity. ananda holds a master's degree in education leadership and policy analysis from UW–Madison and a bachelor's degree in human services and psychology.

Courtney Reed Jenkins (JD, University of Iowa) is co-leader of the Disproportionality Technical Assistance Network and has spent two decades working in nonprofits and government eliminating institutional barriers to success for underserved students. She has conducted federal and state civil rights investigations for the State of Wisconsin; managed equity-focused systems-change initiatives in Colorado, Idaho, Iowa and Wisconsin; and serves on the management team for the Wisconsin Department of Instruction.

Dr. Marian Wright-Edelman said, "Service is the rent we pay for being." Courtney Reed has "paid her rent" through two decades of work in the nonprofit and government sectors — always with a clear focus on eliminating institutional barriers to success for underserved students. She started her career in education as a paraprofessional in a segregated school for students with disabilities, which literally paid for — and informed the focus of — her legal training. She has also served on the senior management team and as board president of the education foundation for a national civil rights organization. Courtney focuses on justice in education in honor of her mother, who grew up white in the segregated south, and her daughters, to whom she wants to leave a fairer world.

Also see:

Leading for Racial Equity Part 2


SHRM Recertification Provider 2021 seal

Continuing Studies is recognized by SHRM to offer Professional Development Credits (PDCs) for the SHRM-CP® or SHRM-SCP®.

Earn Continuing Education Hours

By participating in this class you will earn:

Instructional Hours 6
University of Wisconsin Continuing Education Units .6

Explanation of Continuing Education Hours

Upcoming dates (1)

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Program Questions?

Contact Masha Bubela at masha.bubela@wisc.edu or 608-263-5130

Registration Questions?

Email registrations@pyle.wisc.edu or call 608-262-2451.

Continuing Studies FAQs

Meet your instructor(s)

ananda mirilli

(MS, UW-Madison) is the executive director of nINA Collective, an enterprise dedicated to supporting organizations, institutions, and individuals as they advance their change process and racial equity initiatives. A native of Brazil, ananda has a long history of working with communities in the U.S. and abroad, and is the grant director to address racial disproportionality in special education for the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction.

Courtney Reed Jenkins

(JD, University of Iowa) is co-leader of the Disproportionality Technical Assistance Network, and has spent two decades working in nonprofits and government eliminating institutional barriers to success for underserved students. She has conducted federal and state civil rights investigations for the State of Wisconsin; managed equity-focused systems-change initiatives in Colorado, Idaho, Iowa and Wisconsin; and serves on the management team for the Wisconsin Department of Instruction.