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Art in the Hallway

Call For Artists:

Are you a local artist with a connection to Continuing Studies?
Find out how to apply.

Questions?

Email the Art Committee:
csartshow@dcs.wisc.edu

Continuing Studies Art Gallery

When you visit Continuing Studies, be sure to enjoy the artwork in our Art Gallery on the 7th Floor. We established this gallery to provide a resource for artists to display their art in a public education environment. Artists include employees and their family members, instructors, students, and other friends of Continuing Studies.

There are 3 small exhibit areas—one on each end of the main hallway, and one in the Wisconsin Idea conference room. The hallways are open to the public M, W, Th, and F 7:45am-4:30pm and T 7:45am-7pm.

Thank you to all the artists.


2017-2018 schedule

Dates

WI Idea Room

West Hallway

East Hallway

Dec ’16–Jan ’17

Robert “Bob” Giese

Sandy Beaupre

Sandy Beaupre

Feb–Mar ’17

Patricia Indgjer

Barbara Vater

Renee Ruggles

Apr–May ’17

Chuck Bauer

Ingrid Dohm

Gregg Williard

June–July ’17

Diane Kravetz

Howard Tarnoff

Howard Tarnoff

Aug–Sept ’17

Anne Raskopf

Robin Hackman

Peter Beatty

Oct–Nov ’17

Taisia Kuklina

Brigid O’Keefe

Terri Messinides

Dec ’17–Jan ’18

Joel Wish

Peter van Laeys

Philip Salamone

Feb–Mar ’18

Joel Wish

Becky Tarver-Chase

Gina Hecht


2017-2018 Artists


Chuck Bauer

Madison, WI
608-233-3839
ctbauer@tds.net
ctbauer.com
Apr-May 2017

Currently I am drawn to domestic or natural subjects. I employ conventional approaches to convey nostalgia and tranquility. I am drawn to color and composition exploration, and seek expression of solid structure, light and shade, and playful, accidental, or unexpected results. I believe any artist must balance their thinking: employing not too much or too little; thus, ideally, keeping both painter and viewer, intrigued, engaged, on edge, yet held firm.

Peter Beatty

Middleton, WI
608-332-5993
pbeatt@gmail.com
Aug-Sep 2017

I am a retired physician without formal artistic training, although I have apprenticed with Sally Duback in Milwaukee. I have been interested in contemporary art for 4 decades, especially the mid twentieth century colorists such as Rothko, Frankenthaler, Mary Abbott, and Morris Louis. I also have enjoyed sculptural paper art and the manner in which colored dyes interact with paper pulp. With screen printing I am interested in the pursuit of line, form, and color on hand-made paper emphasizing its texture.

In the future, I hope to develop more tryptich and diptych forms both in paper sculpture as well as prints. I also look forward to developing more calligraphy on my prints as well as photo-emulsion techniques with photograph printing on colored backgrounds.

Sandra K. Beaupre

Madison, WI
608-233-6245
sandykbeaupre@yahoo.com
Dec 2016-Jan 2017

The ocean is as mysterious to me as space and time, and largely unknowable except from its surface. Until only recently, we knew more about the surface of the moon than we knew about the ocean floor.

My subject matter focuses on abstract landscapes and natural mysteries. I try to capture nature’s forms — in particular, those I cannot experience directly: outer space, time, and the movement of the surface and depths of the sea. I recently had an extended opportunity to be out on the open ocean and its beauty in form and movement deeply affected me.

These images utilize high intensity acrylic color and bold forms, intended to capture the beauty, awe, and impermanence of the ocean. My 10-year journey of artistic development has been greatly enhanced through my participation in the UW Continuing Education classes.

Ingrid Dohm

Rockford, IL
815-282-3184
ingepat@ix.netcom.com
ingriddohm.com
Apr-May 2017

My paintings capture the intensity and the very essence of my relationship to art. Floral images, from earliest childhood, have always remained the lynchpin that would lead me to further explorations for my artistic expressions.

I have seriously attempted other avenues of expression, such as portraits and abstract painting, but personal satisfaction has always eluded me.

Even in painting landscapes, a floral image may crop up here or there and often overtake it to become a floral landscape or a floral garden landscape. Still life suffers the same fate.

Robert “Bob” Giese

Madison, WI
Dec 2016-Mar 2017

In this print, Bay of Naniwa Rollers and Strollers, we see figures in Ukio-e period dress roller-skating, eating ice cream, and giving “the hand” to each other near the foothills of Mount Fuji. It mimics traditional Japanese woodblock prints with a twist of the artist’s own humor. Other prints in this series showed Geisha speaking on corded telephones or vacuuming their tatami.

This triptych was created by my grandfather, Robert “Bob” Giese, around the year 1982. Bob was a Wisconsin artist and a UW–Madison alumnus, earning a degree in graphic design in the 1950s. He was a regular in the art scene in Madison, and he exhibited his work at shows and galleries nationally.

My own personal attachment to this piece aside, I must admit it is a near-perfect example of cultural appropriation. My grandfather, despite never having been to Japan, began this series of silkscreen prints that imitated the style of the Japanese artist Hokusai, an iconic printmaker from the Ukio-e period (17th-19th century). — statement by Allison Timmins

Robin Hackman

Madison, WI
608-831-3144
robinhackman@gmail.com
Aug-Sep 2017

This recent body of work represents a combination of influences, and dreaming the results. Yes, dreams play a big part in my art work! I have been influenced by Molas, which are textiles sewn by San Blas Kuna people from off the coast of Panama. I have also been influenced by Australian Aboriginal paintings.

These pieces are sewn on dyed, felted wool from Nepal. I have pieced, beaded, and embroidered the work in layers. They represent landscapes imagined by me, or aerial vistas as one might view on a map. Therefore I have titled these works: Imaginary Landscapes.

I have been sewing, embroidering, and knitting since I was seven. Throughout my high school years I made most of my own clothes, winning a statewide award for a plaid suit I made myself, matching the plaids!

Imaginary Landscapes have been a real pleasure to envision and make, bringing my dreams to life.

Gina Hecht

Waunakee, WI
608-852-5851
ghecht95@gmail.com
Feb-Mar 2017

I began taking painting classes through the UW–Madison Continuing Studies in the fall of 2014. I initially fell in love painting with oils and have recently added soft pastels. Though I paint with realistic detail, I am greatly inspired by impressionism. My subject matter is comprised mostly of landscapes, floral compositions, and animals.

In nature there is a cooperation of peacefulness and quiet strength that is overwhelmingly powerful. I work with a crisp impressionistic style to reflect the dynamic of that relationship. My work gives the viewer a feeling of being part of the moment, suggesting the sensation of being within the artwork itself.

To communicate nature’s balance of strength, serenity, and movement, I focus on using thoughtful and confident brushstrokes and a calm color palette.

Patricia Indgjer

Edgerton, WI
608-295-6882
paindgjer@yahoo.com
Feb-Mar 2017

Patricia Indgjer is artist and owner of Painted Faces. She is a 1989 graduate of UW–Madison with a BS in art. She has been sketching faces from the age of 10 and was introduced to oil painting and Life Drawing in college. After graduating, Patricia lived and worked in the Chicago metropolitan area. She moved back to Wisconsin in 1998 while working in Chicago for another six years. She joined Wisconsin Regional Artist Association in 2013, receiving Honors and State Exhibit for her work. She was selected for the Ella Gardner award for her painting “Red French Beret.” She paints with oil on canvas and focuses primarily on portraits and figurative painting. She is devoted to capturing the range of human emotion in time and place. She now lives in Edgerton, Wisconsin with her husband Mike, and their two children.

Diane Kravetz

Madison, WI
608-238-9148
dkravetz@wisc.edu
Jun-Jul 2017

I began my journey as a photographer in 2008, after I retired from the faculty of the School of Social Work at the UW–Madison. I started by taking photography courses and soon developed a passion for this powerful form of expression.

At first, I focused on event, travel, and street photography. I now concentrate on fine art photography, making photographs to discover and nurture myself as an artist. Fine art photography has given me a new way of seeing and a new way of being. I love the process and challenge of making photographs.

It has been gratifying to receive positive feedback. Domestic Abuse Intervention Services (DAIS) selected two of my photographs for their new building. An office of LSM Chiropractic chose 18 of my images for their walls. I have displayed my work at UW-Hospital, U-Frame It, the Arboretum, Oakwood Village, the Overture Center, the Pyle Center, and the Fluno Center.

Taisia Kuklina

Madison, WI
608-234-2355
tayakuklina@gmail.com
taisiakuklinafineart.weebly.com
Oct-Nov 2017

My aim is to capture a mood of muted harmony and enduring grace. I always paint from life, searching for an honest and timeless beauty. I strive for a calm and abstract mood in my paintings, consciously keeping a balance between clarity and ambiguity on the painted surface. My goal is to continue finding beauty in everyday life and present it with authenticity.

Terri Messinides

Madison, WI
773-391-5509
tmessinides@aol.com
Oct-Nov 2017

My aim is to capture a mood of muted harmony and enduring grace. I always paint from life, searching for an honest and timeless beauty. I strive for a calm and abstract mood in my paintings, consciously keeping a balance between clarity and ambiguity on the painted surface. My goal is to continue finding beauty in everyday life and present it with authenticity.

Brigid O’Keefe

Rio, WI
608-333-3161
birdieo@frontier.com
Oct-Nov 2017

The collection of photographs for my art display is my description of the idea that Autumn is the second spring, when every leaf is a flower.

Why the leaves fall: A Lakota Legend — Many moons ago when the world was still very young, plant and animal life was enjoying the beautiful summer weather. But as the days went by, autumn set in, and the weather became colder with each passing day. The grass and flower folk were in a sad condition, for they had no protection from the sharp cold. Just when it seemed that there was no hope for living, she who looks after the things of Her creation came to their aid. She said that the leaves of the trees should fall to the ground, spreading a soft, warm blanket over the tender roots of the grass and flowers. To repay the trees for the loss of their leaves, she allowed them one last bright array of beauty. That is why each year, during Indian summer, the trees take on their pretty farewell colors of red, gold, and brown. After this final display they turn to their appointed task; covering the Earth with a thick rug of warmth against the chill of winter.

Anne Raskopf

Oconomowoc, WI
262-490-8473
anneraskopf@yahoo.com
anneraskopf.com
Aug-Sep 2017

I’m miles away when I paint. My journey doesn’t take me far, but as Twyla Tharp says, “art is the only way to run away without leaving home.” Monotonous responsibilities, flashing screens/technology, and the dull glow of traffic far away can often make a person feel trapped. Humans were born into nature and thus it is a powerful escape.

Escaping into nature can clear my head. I do not hesitate to go for a walk, take a hike, or ride my horse in the woods. I take a deep breath and fill my lungs with the forest’s air. Looking around I notice the colors in the sky, trees, and ground cover. I hear the sounds the wind makes, I absorb all that I can and return to my canvas to reflect my experiences with nature.

Renee Ruggles

Arena, WI
989-878-0049
renee.ruggles@gmail.com
Feb-Mar 2017

Beauty is everywhere, from the rainbow of colors in our skin, to the personality evoked by the slant of a brow, to the inner glow of a rose petal. Working in several veins at once, I often use traditional oil painting to convey modern subjects. I also do pastels that depict the myriad textures found in nature.

In my Hands series, I explore taboo emotions such as frustration and depression. To ignore negative emotion is to stigmatize people who are experiencing devastation. Life isn’t perfect; but, it’s all valid, beautiful, even gorgeous. Modern insistence on “staying positive” can seem to blame victims of life’s hardships for their situations. By sharing my own emotional experiences, I hope to help others feel less alone.

I’ve exhibited in the Michigan State Governor’s Residence, the OPA Eastern Regional Exhibit, the Midland Center for the Arts, and was featured in the Midland Daily News as a local master.

Philip Salamone

Madison, WI
608-345-7745
philipsalamone@gmail.com
philipsalamone.com
Dec 2017-Jan 2018

This exhibition is a collection of portraits of the citizens of Madison. I believe that a painting is a record of an experience, and I enjoy sitting with the subject and having a conversation and painting their portrait. Your state of mind, your sense of engagement, the smells in the air, and the other people in room all contribute to influence every mark that is made on the canvas. My hope is that this show is a representation of some of the citizens of our city, and that these portraits convey a sense of who the model is, who I am, and the relationship between us.

Philip Salamone has been an instructor for four years at the University of Wisconsin – Madison Continuing Studies Department.

Howard Tarnoff

Madison, WI
262-498-9138
howardrtarnoff@gmail.com
Jun-Jul 2017

I have over 40 years of creative experience in the toy industry; in corporate management and independently as a consultant and inventor. I have run the product development for such products as Golden Books, Crayola Crayons, Lionel Trains, Craftmaster art kits, and MPC model kits. I have invented and licensed more than 30 products to the toy industry companies such as Mattel, Hasbro, FisherPrice, Milton Bradley, and more. I was also a co-owner of an art gallery.

Now retired, I have been intrigued by the manipulative capabilities in photography and technology. To me, everything is alive and has a deeper vision. I try to play up what I see in the photo manipulations I generate. With “The Eyes Have It!” I personify what I see in nature. “A Touch of Glass” uses macro-photography to show the too often unseen depths of art glass. My wife’s (my DCS connection) artistic bent helps me push through the frustrations of trying to get it right.

Becky Tarver-Chase

Madison, WI
608-890-3253
becky.tarverchase@wisc.edu
dangerbears.com
Feb-Mar 2018

These photographic portraits are inspired by the traditional jointed teddy bears that I design and make by hand under the name Dangerbears. Each bear requires dozens of hours of work, and unlike mass-produced teddy bears, artist teddy bears — made for adult collectors — allow for as much creativity and experimentation as the artist wishes. Each bear is one-of-a-kind, and each has a distinct personality, which is most evident in the faces of the bears.

One of the challenges of making artist teddy bears in the twenty-first century is marketing them online to a worldwide audience. To do this, I’ve worked almost as hard on my photography skills as my bear-making skills. I hope that the photos you see here capture the cuteness and furriness of the bears, but also the empathy and kindness of their facial expressions. After all, the mission of any teddy bear is to comfort its owner, and to speak to the part of us that needs taking care of.

Peter van Laeys

Madison, WI
608-437-4282
pvanlaeys@gmail.com
vanlaeys.net
Dec 2017-Jan 2018

I paint because it’s satisfying; it feels good to take something conceptual like an idea or a memory and make it into something solid.

I make oil paintings on stretched canvas or canvas panel, mostly sticking with a medium-sized brush. I start with a white or black canvas and then apply a thin layer of earthy colors to provide a foundation for the painting. Then I fill in the forms with thicker colors mixed on a palette.

These pieces are inspired by what I find beautiful. Several are landscapes and several are inspired by space photographs taken by Hubble. I am a student of UW continuing studies; I’ve taken two classes in the recent past for painting.

Barbara Vater

Madison, WI
608-239-3032
barbara.vater@gmail.com
Feb-Mar 2017

Distinctive and memorable scenes of the natural world, encountered on hikes and in travel, inspire me. My sketches and photographs serve as starting points for the paintings.

My work is defined by range and energy rather than subject matter. The goal is to produce a compelling and memorable image that shares my joy and wonder of our world.

A painting is a conversation between the artist and the canvas and then between the canvas and the viewer. I hope you enjoy a conversation with a painting here today.

I’m a member of madisonartguild.com and wisconsinvisualartists.com. My paintings are held in private collections in California, Colorado, Georgia, Ohio, Wisconsin, USA, and Macon, France.

Gregg Williard

Madison, WI
608-256-5089
g_williard@yahoo.com
Apr-May 2017

I’ve been drawing and painting for fifty years. For much of that time I have also been a fiction writer and poet. My work finds inspiration in movies, comic books, and many other narrative traditions. My visual work is constantly informed by stories, and my visual work is often the basis for fiction and poetry. One of my ongoing projects is a cycle of drawings, animations, stories, and prose poems about “The Secret Stunt Woman,” chronicling the adventures of a woman tested by inner and outer challenges, dangers, and mysteries.

Joel Wish

Middleton, WI
608-228-9389
joelwish1@gmail.com
Dec 2017-Mar 2018

I grew up outside of Washington, D.C. and had formal training in oil painting at the Corcoran School of Art and through private classes. I studied sculpture and ceramics at Alfred University and since then have had training in watercolor and pastel. I’ve worked almost exclusively in pastels and photography over the past 20 years. I am a member of the Washington Island Art Association and the Madison Art Guild. My paintings are currently on display locally at the Newell Gallery in Waunakee and the Johnston Gallery in Mineral Point, WI.

I try to emphasize movement, color, and light in my paintings and photographs. The Midwest provides a wonderful range of landscapes and waterscapes as subject matter for much of what I paint and photograph. I enjoy painting literally and abstractly. The colored surfaces I paint on bring depth and vibrancy of color to artwork and allow an appreciation of what is both on and beneath the surface.